Clay Maitland

On a quest for quality in shipping

Maritime TV’s ‘Mondays with Maitland’ – A Call for a National Maritime Education Conference in 2015 in DC


In this 19th interview in the series, Clay Maitland discusses importance of fostering communication between maritime educational professionals in this country, from the maritime high schools and vocational schools though the union institutions and the maritime academies, to compare notes on curricula and interface with industry. He proposes a large-scale National Maritime Education Conference to be held in Washington D.C. in the September-October 2015 timeframe… Continue reading

Merchant Marine Policy Coalition Applauds MARAD Administrator Confirmation

The Chairman of the Merchant Marine Policy Coalition (MMPC), Clay Maitland, today applauded the Senate confirmation of MARAD Administrator Paul ‘Chip’ Jaenichen.  Stating that this confirmation is “Well deserved and long overdue”, Maitland congratulated Jaenichen and wished him well on the ambitious and necessary work that lies before him.

Coincident to Tuesday’s news, Maitland had released a webcast on Monday calling for the confirmation.  “Congress has been relaxed on taking a position on maritime policy. With Russia, the South China Sea, the Middle East and more, we are facing global challenges analogous to the late 1930’s.  We need a strong US flag merchant marine to provide sealift capability.  Chip has been leading

They don’t come much bigger……

Looking at the time lapse video of the gradual refloating of the Costa Concordia with the wrecked ship being towed just clear of the site, one can only be lost in admiration at what the salvors have accomplished. It does however suggest that there is probably no wreck likely to happen in the future which cannot (always supposing the insurers are paying and the chequebook remains open) be taken away!
There is another interesting aspect to this astonishing salvage and “recovery” operation, in that the eventual destination of the wreck in the Port of Genoa might be considered a “place of refuge”. Assuming that the operation is successful and the vessel delivered to a place of safety and the subsequent recyclers, it might suggest a route that can perhaps be… Continue reading

Hope and Anchor

It was some years ago that an archaeological expedition in the eastern Mediterranean fished up an anchor that was dated to around 200AD. With primitive flukes and a stock, it had more than a passing resemblance to those used on merchant ships 1800 years later. Rather than suggesting how advanced Roman technology was in those days, this does not exactly reflect favourably on the advances in anchoring techniques , since that ancient ship lost her anchor.
Dragging anchor, as any P&I risk manager will tell you, is one of the major reasons why ships go ashore and the lack of any great advances in anchoring equipment might be identified as a contributor. Ships have got bigger, offer more windage, but anchor design has largely remained static. It is not helped… Continue reading

The fish is off

It is a question I have often asked. How, now you have ships crewed by one man and a dog, what happens when the man – or the dog, for that matter- is taken ill and cannot turn to? It reminds me of a time when I, as the second mate, was attacked by a duff mutton pie in Glasgow and for 24 hours, thought I was about to die. The Chief Officer, who was a dayworker in our well-manned ships, took over my job, with only a little muttering about malingerers. Or the time on the NZ coast when the Chief Officer was taken ashore for three weeks with a severe attack of piles, with the other three of us advancing one up in our ranks and covering for… Continue reading